FAQs

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Q.
Having trouble viewing the ÆKOS website?
A.
The ÆKOS website is optimised for use with the latest versions of compatible browsers. If the website is not displaying correctly, please update your browser.
 
The ÆKOS website is fully compatible with the following browser versions:
        Internet Explorer Versions 9 and above (download)
        Mozilla Firefox 6.x and above (download)
        Google Chrome 13.x and above (download)
        Safari 5.x and above (download)
Q.
What is ÆKOS?
A.
ÆKOS is the Advanced Ecological Knowledge and Observation System.
To find out more visit
About ÆKOS.
Q.
What is the purpose of ÆKOS?
A.
ÆKOS is being built to enable scientists and policy-makers to discover, access, view, extract, analyse and visualise the wealth of ecological data and its research context on Australia’s terrestrial ecosystems. ÆKOS provides a ‘one-stop shop’ that not only delivers complex data but also allows scientists to understand how the data was collected so that they can assess the fitness-for-purpose, which is essential for re-purposing, analysis and synthesis. Researchers and agency data providers will also be able to submit data.
Q.
Why build another data portal about plants and animals?
A.
Some state agencies already publish biodiversity data online via state-wide ‘atlases’, while the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) delivers national biodiversity information on species and taxonomy via their portal.
 
As we move into the realm of more complex ecological data (i.e. data collected systematically using plot-based methods), understanding how the data was collected is essential for data re-purposing, analysis and synthesis activities.
 
Complex ecological data sets generally come from different regions, and use different methods of collection, taxonomic classification systems, storage formats, and data structures. Because of inconsistencies between different datasets, this can make search, retrieval, and analysis of the data difficult.
 
ÆKOS intends to resolve these issues through semantic technologies. This will ensure that the content, meaning and context of ecological data can be represented and stored in a rich and consistent format. This means that we can not only provide an understanding of the data, but we can find more information because it is uniformly structured and described – once you learn how to read one dataset, you know how to read all datasets within ÆKOS.
Q.
Who can access the data portal?
A.
Any member of the public can access the data portal but it is mainly designed for the ecosystem science community such as agency data providers, researchers, educators, students, decision-makers, funding bodies, data managers and technology specialists.